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A Ray of Hope (52 week batterers' workbook) - English

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Price: $30.00
This workbook was developed for use by men and women who were remanded by the court to attend a 52 week batterers' program. The workbook contains invaluable information regarding stress, anger management, communication patterns and more. "A Ray of Hope" has been used by helping professionals throughout the United States and around the world. It contains 52 comprehensive educational lessons that are designed to move people from patterns of abuse and violence to lives of health and stability. Utilizing a psychoeducational approach, this publication provides concrete techniques and examples of ways in which to stem ingrained cycles of abuse verbal, physical, economic, etc. through lessons that explore how and why such cycles develop and ways to stop such cycles by replacing old methods of coping.

HERE’S WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

ABOUT A “RAY OF HOPE”:

 

I’ve been running a new group using your Domestic violence workbook for about three months now.  The difference in the quality of the group is amazing. Using your format, it is much easier to accommodate new members joining the group.  All of the essential material from the Duluth model is included in your Workbook, along with invaluable exercises about family relationships, communication skills and other issues.  The men in the group have already read ahead and expressed interest in the specific sections.   One man who had been in my previous group took me aside to tell me how much he likes having all the material there in one book and being able to refer to it at any time during the group meetings.  We’ve used your video, “A ray of Hope,” and the men were quite impressed with the guys on the tape.  They could relate to them, and they especially enjoyed the guy who used so much denial.

Sally McCollum, Ph.D.

The Wood River Counseling Center

Hailey, Idaho

Unfortunately, for us, but fortunate for our clients, we have to completely redo our program for batterers now.  You have given us the format with A Ray of Hope to be able to accomplish that, and we are grateful for the workbook and program curriculum, which you have designed.

 

David Reamy, LCSW

Oasis Counseling Centers

Victorville, California

As a licensed psychologist and health care policy expert for the Senate Health and Human Services Committee, I was so impressed with the strength of your curriculum; particularly your integration of the theory and etiology of family violence into useful techniques that can be employed in direct service settings.  Moreover, you had the latest public policy information that was finely integrated into the material along with videotapes that were culturally and linguistically sensitive.  I believe A Ray of Hope will help California alleviate this violence/abusive behavior that significantly impact many of the citizens of our state.

 

Lenore A. Tate, Ph.D.

Principal Health Policy Consultant

California State Senate

A Ray of Hope, the student workbook is written in a clear and concise manner and its availability in both English and Spanish, an asset.  For all of these reasons, Cedarwood has added your curriculum to our domestic violence program.

Joe Larkin, Ph.D., LCSW

Cedarwood Counseling Group

Lancaster, California


A PARTIAL LIST OF PROGRAMS USING THE

ANDERSON CURRICULUM

 

·   MOSCOW WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER

MOSCOW, RUSSIA

·   CHILD ABUSE THERAPEUTIC & TRAINING SERVICES

CAPETOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

·   CONSULTORIO CARLOS TRUPP EQUIPO SOCIAL

TALCA, CHILE

·   NUEVO AMANECER LATINO

BALDWIN PARK, CA

·   SANTA CLARA COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN SERVICES

SANTA CLARA, CA

·   LOS ANGELES COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN SERVICES

LOS ANGELES, CA

·   COMPREHENSIVE COUNSELING SERVICES

MADERA, CA

·   UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS

GARDENA, CA

·   ALAMEDA COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH

OAKLAND, CA

·   YWCA

FRESNO, CA

·   YWCA

SAN DIEGO, CA

·   COMPTON UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

COMPTON, CA

·   ALTA

FULLERTON, CA

·   CHARLES DREW MEDICAL SCHOOL

LOS ANGELES, CA

·   SAN MARTIN COUNSELING CENTER

LOS ANGELES, CA

·   SBAC

SACRAMENTO, CA

·   CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

LOS ANGELES, CA

·   SECOND CHANCE, INC

HAYWARD, CA

·   THE COALITION OF MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

LOS ANGELES, CA

·   SACRAMENTO COUNSELLING ASSOCIATES

SACRAMENTO, CA

·   KOREAN AMERICAN FAMILY SERVICE CENTER

LOS ANGELES, CA

·   CRIMINAL JUSTICE SOCIAL SERVICE AGENCY

SAN FRANCISCO, CA

·   TRUCHA INC

SALINAS, CA

·   LARRY CORRIGAN AND ASSOCIATES

SAN DIEGO, CA

·   INLAND VALLEY DRUG AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY SERVICES

POMONA, CA

This Workbook is designed for use by men who are ordered by the court to attend a Batterers’ Treatment Program.  The primary goal of this program is to stop person directed violence regardless of the reason.

It is our hope that men permitted by the court to attend a Batterers' Counseling Program will realize from the outset that they are given an opportunity to learn alternatives to violence, rather than risk jail or prison.   This program is based on the assumption that violence is a learned behavior and therefore can be unlearned.

Each participant who invests in the program will be given the tools needed to change from violent controlling behavior to behavior that approximate equality in male-female relationships.  The model used is a psycho-educational approach in which old violent behaviors and attitudes are examined and confronted.  Positive, healthy forms of behavior based on equality and mutual respect are introduced.

Children often learn abusive, violent behavior at a very early age.  Violence in families tends to be generational.  Adults who abuse their children or partners were often victims in their own families.  Men are socialized to be aggressive and violent in their lives.  In order to change the behavior of men who batter, there must be a coordinated effort consisting of law enforcement, the courts, prosecuting attorneys, shelters for victims of family violence, the Probation Department, and agencies and providers who work with men who batter.

What is Family Violence?

While the origins of domestic violence remain controversial, the majority of programs throughout the United States define domestic violence as a combination of physical, sexual, and psychological abuses.

 The following are all considered forms of family violence:

  1. Child Abuse
  2. Spousal Abuse
  3. Spousal Rape
  4. Incest
  5. Elder Abuse
  6. Sibling Abuse
  7. Child Molestation

What are the causes of Family Violence? The following list are some of the caused of family violence.

  1. Larned Behavior
  2. Personal History of Abuse
  3. Alcohol and Drug Use as a Contributing Factor
  4. Socialization of Men to be Aggressive and Violent
-GEORGE ANDERSON


I have read and reviewed the Domestic Violence Program Workbook.  The drive and commitment that this program requires of its participants is to be commended.  The emotional exercises and topics discussed within the program and workbook are an integral part of the batterers' recovery to controlling their anger and behavior.

I highly endorse this programmatic approach to deal with the Batterer's behavior.

 

Sincerely,

OLIVER M. THOMPSON

   Chief of Police

   Inglewood, California



We are approved through all Probation Departments for the U.S.  http://probation.lacounty.gov/PDF/ApprovedBP.pdf

CA Penal Code 1203.098 

(a) Unless otherwise provided, a person who works as a facilitator in a batterers' intervention program that provides programs for batterers pursuant to subdivision 
(c) of Section 
1203.097 shall complete the following requirements before being eligible to work as a facilitator in a batterers' intervention program:
(1) Forty hours of basic core training. A minimum of eight hours of this instruction shall be provided by a shelter-based or shelter-approved trainer. The core curriculum shall include the following components:
(A) A minimum of eight hours in basic domestic violence knowledge focusing on victim safety and the role of domestic violence shelters in a community-coordinated response.
(B) A minimum of eight hours in multicultural, cross-cultural, and multiethnic diversity and domestic violence.
(C) A minimum of four hours in substance abuse and domestic violence.
(D) A minimum of four hours in intake and assessment, including the history of violence and the nature of threats and substance abuse.
(E) A minimum of eight hours in group content areas focusing on gender roles and socialization, the nature of violence, the dynamics of power and control, and the effects of abuse on children and others as required by Section 1203.097.
(F) A minimum of four hours in group facilitation.
(G) A minimum of four hours in domestic violence and the law, ethics, all requirements specified by the probation department pursuant to Section 1203.097, and the role of batterers' interventionprograms in a coordinated-community response.
(H) Any person that provides documentation of coursework, or equivalent training, that he or she has satisfactorily completed, shall be exempt from that part of the training that was covered by the satisfactorily completed coursework.
(I) The coursework that this person performs shall count toward the continuing education requirement.
(2) Fifty-two weeks or no less than 104 hours in six months, as a trainee in an approved batterers' intervention program with a minimum of a two-hour group each week. A training program shall include at least one of the following:
(A) Cofacilitation internship in which an experienced facilitator is present in the room during the group session.
(B) Observation by a trainer of the trainee conducting a group session via a one-way mirror.
(C) Observation by a trainer of the trainee conducting a group session via a video or audio recording.
(D) Consultation or supervision twice a week in a six-month program or once a week in a 52-week program.
(3) An experienced facilitator is one who has the following qualifications:
(A) Documentation on file, approved by the agency, evidencing that the experienced facilitator has the skills needed to provide quality supervision and training.
(B) Documented experience working with batterers for three years, and a minimum of two years working with batterers' groups.
(C) Documentation by January 1, 2003, of coursework or equivalent training that demonstrates satisfactory completion of the 40-hour basic core training.
(b) A facilitator of a batterers' intervention program shall complete, as a minimum continuing education requirement, 16 hours annually of continuing education in either domestic violence or a related field with a minimum of eight hours in domestic violence.
(c) A person or agency with a specific hardship may request the probation department, in writing, for an extension of time to complete the training or to complete alternative training options.
(d) (1) An experienced facilitator, as defined in paragraph (3) of subdivision (a), is not subject to the supervision requirements of this section, if he or she meets the requirements of subparagraph (C) of paragraph (3) of subdivision (a).
(2) This section does not apply to a person who provides batterers' treatment through a jail education program if the person in charge of that program determines that the person providing treatment has adequate education or training in domestic violence or a related field.
(e) A person who satisfactorily completes the training requirements of a county probation department whose training program is equivalent to or exceeds the training requirements of this act shall be exempt from the training requirements of this act.



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